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OUR DUDES: Americans at the 2014 Tour de France: A Factsheet

Tejay van Garderen, 25
BMC Racing Team
Tacoma, Washington
Tours finished: 3

Peter Stetina, 26
BMC Racing Team
Boulder, Colorado
Tours finished: 0

Edward “Ted” King, 31
Cannondale
Exeter, New Hampshire
Tours finished: 0

Andrew Talansky, 25
Garmin-Sharp
Miami, Florida
Tours finished: 1

Alex Howes, 26
Garmin-Sharp
Golden, Colorado
Tours finished: 0

Ben King, 25
Garmin-Sharp
North Garden, VA
Tours finished: 0

Chris Horner, 42
Lampre-Merida
Okinawa Prefecture, Japan
Tours finished: 5

Danny Pate, 35
Team Sky
Colorado Springs, CO
Tours finished: 3

Matthew Busche, 29
Trek Factory Racing
Wauwatosa, WI
Tours Finished: 0

AMERICANS AT THE TOUR: A Factsheet

  1. First American to race in the Tour: Jacques Boyer in 1981
  2. First American to win the Tour: Greg Lemond.
  3. First American team to race the Tour: 7-Eleven.
  4. Greg Lemond was famous for eating Mexican food and playing golf on rest days during the Tour.
  5. Garmin flew the CEO/Founder of Chipotle out to France in order to cook rest day burritos in 2008.
  6. American TDF stage winners (H and L are the most popular letters for American winners, based on last names):
    1. Lance Armstrong
    2. Tyler Farrar
    3. Tyler Hamilton
    4. Andrew Hampsten
    5. George Hincapie
    6. Floyd Landis
    7. Levi Leipheimer
    8. Greg LeMond
    9. Davis Phinney
    10. Jeff Pierce
    11. David Zabriskie

Godzilla ゴジラ: A Factsheet

  1. After debuting in Ishirō Honda's 1954 film Godzilla, Godzilla has appeared in 32 full length motion pictures on either side of the Pacific—28 in Japan, four in the US.
  2. Originally a metaphor for the dangers of nuclear weapons in response to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, Godzilla eventually took on lighter roles as a more straightforward monster (both as a hero and as a villain).
  3. Take the Japanese words gorira ("gorilla"), and kujira ("whale") and you have a portmanteau: Godzilla.
  4. Godzilla is usually awoken from his underwater hibernation by nuclear radiation.
  5. A Hollywood Walk of Fame Star and MTV Movie Awards Lifetime Achievement Award attest to the longevity and importance of Godzilla's career.
  6. The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society christened a vessel Gojira. Its purpose is to target and harass Japanese whalers in defense of whales in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary.
  7. In 1985, the North Korean government released a movie named Pulgasari, which was very similar and obviously inspired Godzilla. To make the film, North Korea kidnapped South Korean director Shin Sang-ok, and listed Kim Jong-il as executive producer. Shin Sang-ok was forced to live and work in North Korea from 1978 to 1986, and fled to safety during the Vienna Film Festival, by going to the US embassy.